N IS FOR NIGHTMARE



Kannemeyer is a South African print artist and cartoonist whose work has commented on the racial and political tensions of Apartheid and post-Apartheid South Africa. Starting from a conventional liberal position, detesting Apartheid, rejecting his Boer heritage, and welcoming the "New South Africa," his art has gradually evolved into something darker and more complex, as disturbing trends become increasingly apparent in the so-called "Rainbow Nation."

PARALLEL UNIVERSES

The American Mystique and the American Reality



Over the past few decades, British society, culture, and politics have increasingly come under the sway of America. Our common language has always made it particularly easy for us to influence each other, but, with the expansion of the media through cable and satellite TV, and the spread of ‘viral trends’ like blogging, internet sharing, and social media, this process is rapidly accelerating, with most of the influence flowing one way, from America to Britain, rather than the other way round.

Both in terms of substance and style, British politics has been particularly susceptible to American influences. In the past few years our political establishment has accepted ideas like multiculturalism, political correctness, and affirmative action that clearly stem from America’s unique conditions as a country with a 300-year history of high immigration, unassimilated indigenous peoples (Red Indians), and a history of racial injustice (domestic slavery). While it may be possible to make a case for some of these ideas in an American context, they have zero relevance to Britain, a country with a history of racial homogeneity going back thousands of years and the proud record of leading the way in abolishing slavery.

CARNIVAL OF REPENTANCE

by Elizabeth Wright

Now that the dust has settled on that overhyped, fevered Glenn Beck rally, what have we learned?  Is it clearer than ever that no sober knight will come riding in to bring the enlightenment that some of us thought the Tea Partiers might have offered? It appears that the expectations surrounding those initial enigmatic stirrings, which made one almost believe that the furor was about more than just anger over political issues, have been extinguished. Was it all just a momentary aberration?